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Bentonite clay for my locks. The process of extracting lint continues…  

Bentonite clay for my locks. The process of extracting lint continues…  

sandrarevollar:

(6) ♥

sandrarevollar:

(6) ♥

iburnedoutlikeabrightlight:

#safari #giraffe #nofilter

iburnedoutlikeabrightlight:

#safari #giraffe #nofilter

donkeysanddug:

Pictures from Tanzania.  C and his friends took these pictures.  From the bottom of the crater to the top of the mountain.  They had a wonderful time.

allhailtherenegades:

"so she’s gay now?"

yeah she turned it all the paperwork last week and her acceptance letter came this morning, it was all pretty sudden

did-you-kno:

Source

clrama:

ʷʰʸ      ʷʰʸ             ʷʰʸ

       ʷʰʸ            ʷʰʸ       ʷʰʸ      ʷʰʸ

   ʷʰʸ         jeans with fake pockets   ʷʰʸ

         ʷʰʸ            ʷʰʸ

Black women face yet other serious forms of gendered racism—the double burden of suffering racial prejudice and stereotyping because they are Black and female. One example is the negative imaging of Black women as “jungle bunnies.” Since at least the seventeenth century, this white (especially white male) stereotype has accented Black women’s allegedly exotic sexuality. Researcher Diane Roberts has shown how white notions of Blackness have frequently been loaded with sexuality. European books, beginning in the 1600s, portrayed Black women and men naked and with exaggerated sexual organs. “The white world drew the Black woman’s body as excessively and flagrantly sexual, quite different from the emerging ideology of purity and modesty which defined the white woman’s body,” Roberts has explained.

This view has persisted now over the centuries. Thus, greatly influenced by and perpetuating such racist images, numerous white men during the days of slavery and Jim Crow segregation sought out, molested, and/or raped Black women. Moreover, today, much social science research continues to show that some white men still image and seek out Black women as exotic sex objects. In this manner, gendered racism is regularly inscribed in the bodies of Black women.
"
Joe Feagin (via wretchedoftheearth)

dreadfullydyed:

Mwila of Angola 

Mwila (or Mwela, Mumuhuila, or Muhuila) women are famous for their very special hairstyles. Hairstyles are very important and meaningful in Mwila culture. Women coat their hair with a red paste called, oncula, which is made of crushed red stone. They also put a mix of oil, crushed tree bark, dried cow dung and herbs on their hair.

Besides they decorate their hairstyle with beads, cauri shells (real or plastic ones) and even dried food. Shaving the forehead is considered as a sign of beauty. The plaits, which look like dreadlocks, are called nontombi and have a precise meaning. Women or girls usually have 4 or 6 nontombi, but when they only have 3 it means that someone died in their family. 

(Source: Eric Lafforgue)